Sell With Us

How To Repair Rust On Your Car WithoutWelding

How To Repair Rust On Your Car Without Welding

It’s common to get rust around the lower portions of the car and around the wheel wells. What happens is, while you drive the car, a rock kicks up and hits the car exposing raw metal. Over time that raw metal rusts and the surface paint bubbles. It’s important to repair rust as soon as you see it to avoid welding and new panels.


Rust Repair takes 4 simple steps…


WHAT YOU WILL NEED…

  • Sand Paper
  • Body Filler
  • Masking Tape
  • Eye Protection
  • Dust Mask
  • Gloves
  • Spray Paint


STEP 1: RUST REMOVAL

Remove all the rust and bubbled up paint with Sand Paper, working your way down to the bare metal, using a coarse 80 grit sand paper. Chances are, if there is rust on the surface of the vehicle, there will be rust on the rear of the panel also, which will need to be sanded back. The bare metal on the rear of the panel needs to be sealed with rust reformer to prevent further rusting. When dry, spray over the rust reformer with a rubber undercoating. Rubber undercoating is thick and doesn’t chip off when rocks kick up from the road, therefore avoiding further damage to the repaired panel work.


STEP 2: BODY FILLER

There will be holes and rough patches where the rust has eaten through the metal. After all that sanding, the metal that had the rust is going to be thinner and weaker than the metal around it, and will need a layer of fiberglass strand filler to give strength to the area as well as filling in the holes. Returning to the front of the panel, clean the surface with alcohol ready to apply the Body Filler, which has been mixed to packaged instructions. Apply thin layers of Body Filler with a spreader, pressing firmly to push the filler into dents and holes, as well as ensuring there are no air bubbles. Build the layers up to the level of the surrounding panel. When dry, sand flat with 40 grit sand paper, blending it into the body panel. Finish off with thin layers of smoothing gold filler.


STEP 3: SAND THE BODY FILLER SMOOTH

Begin with 80 grit sand paper, shaping with a sanding block. Work your way up from 80 grit sand paper to 100 grit, 320 grit, and finally 400 grit. Once dry, wipe down the work area with alcohol to ensure it is thoroughly clean.


STEP 4: PAINTING

Mask off the area you don’t want to paint and begin with two to three coats of grey filler primer, allowing drying time between coats. Lightly sand the area with 600 grit sand paper, and at the same time gently scuff about a 5cm area of existing paintwork. Thoroughly clean with alcohol, ready to spray paint. Using light coats, spray paint the entire area including the scuffed paint work. Allow to dry between coats. Once two or three coats are dry, it’s time to move on to the Clear Coat, repeating the process lightly layering two or three coats and allowing to dry. After a few days, light wet sand the entire panel for a perfect finish.